FEATURED

Response to the FDA Med Watch December 16, 2016

On Wednesday, December 14, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a Drug Safety Communication warning that; “repeated or lengthy use of general anesthetic or sedation drugs during surgeries or procedures in children younger than three years of age or in pregnant women during the final trimester may affect development of children’s brains”. The FDA defined lengthy as greater than three hours of exposure.

While there is abundant animal data concerning suspected toxicities in prolonged and multiple anesthetics, the accumulated human data suggest that one brief anesthetic is not associated with cognitive or behavioral abnormalities in children. Most but not all studies in children do however suggest an association between repeated and or prolonged exposure and subsequent difficulties with learning or behavior. It is not yet known whether the anesthetic drug or some other factor is responsible for these findings. Rigorous research to further characterize any possible associations is ongoing.
Click here for full statement

Consensus Statement on the Use of Anesthetics and Sedatives in Children

Each year, millions of young children require surgery and other procedures for serious or life-threatening medical conditions or to improve their quality of life. Anesthetic and sedative drugs are widely used to help ensure the safety, health, and comfort of children undergoing these procedures.

PATIENT SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH FUND

Our goal is to raise pledges in support of advancing pediatric anesthesia safety efforts. Specifically, your support would allow $100,000 annually to support pediatric anesthesia safety research. The SPA will commit to reporting the results of this research to the membership.

CURRENT SPA NEWS

Neurodevelopmental outcome

at 2 years of age after general anaesthesia and awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS): an international multicentre, randomised controlled trial

Background
Preclinical data suggest that general anaesthetics affect brain development. There is mixed evidence from cohort studies that young children exposed to anaesthesia can have an increased risk of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. We aimed to establish whether general anaesthesia in infancy has any effect on neurodevelopmental outcome. Here we report the secondary outcome of neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age in the General Anaesthesia compared to Spinal anaesthesia (GAS) trial.

Click here to view full abstract.


Quality & Safety Committee





Patient Safety Alert



OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF SPA

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA JOURNAL

UPCOMING SPA MEETINGS & EDUCATION

SPA-AAP Pediatric Anesthesiology 2017

March 3-5, 2017
JW Marriott Austin
Austin, TX
Mobile Meeting Guide
Hotel Reservations
Exhibitor Information